forge

Of Chickens and Eggs

While working with a client yesterday we were discussing the idea of having email (or parts of your email) as a window in SharePoint.  They were discussing how the limited space made things difficult while simultaneously discussing how it was important to have a one stop experience for the portal.  Then the comment came up that one member of the group always started their day with email.

A light bulb went off.  You can set an HTML (web) page as the default view for a folder in outlook.  Simply right click the folder, select properties, select the Home Page tab, enter your URL, Click the ‘Show home page by default for this folder’ checkbox and click OK.  Now whenever you click on the folder the web page appears.

Now they can decide whether they want Outlook housing SharePoint or SharePoint housing email via Outlook Web Access.  While on that note.  Send me an email if you’ld like to beta some utilities that are like the ‘My Inbox’, ‘My Calendar’, and ‘My Tasks’ web parts in SPS.  I have written a set which don’t require the user name to be set in properties so they can be deployed on a shared view.  I’d like to get some testing done on them.

bee

Ramblings: Things I hate about debugging

So one of the things that I truly despise about debugging is working for a few hours trying to make something work only to find out later that it isn’t that thing that’s broken at all… Case in point.  I was getting a Access denied type message while trying to write something to the registry.  I thought it was code access security — because that’s normally what it is.  It turned out to be that I forgot to ask for write access when I opened up the key… ARG!

Now I’m off chasing some enumerator problem from a base class…

forge

Sniping SPSBackup Threads

I’ve not yet had a chance to test … I was wondering if the SQL Sniping script — designed to kill blocking threads — could be used to kill off the leftovers from a bad SPSBackup session so that the next backup could run successfully.  The SQL sniping script can be found at http://www.integer.org … I’ll have to try it the next time SPSBackup decides to not close down correctly.
forge

How to create a technology replacement strategy

When you are considering the cost of your organization’s technology, you must consider its life cycle and make allowances not only for the purchase price of the technology but also its support costs.

Life cycle

Every mechanical device has a life cycle. In the early days of the device, there is a period of “shaking out” when a relatively large number of problems will be discovered. This’s why many mechanical devices go through a burn-in period at the manufacturer in an attempt to work out the problems. This is generally followed by a long period of relatively low problems. Finally, a gradual climb in support costs ensues.

Think of it like buying a car. If you have ever bought a new car, or have known someone who has, often the new car has a few kinks. After the first month or so, the car settles down and generally has few problems. Once the car has become a few years old, it begins to develop problems. The problems may be gradual at first but eventually, if you keep the car long enough, you begin to feel that it is nothing but problems.

The technology that you use in your organization is the same way. Every piece of technical infrastructure you have will work well at first, or at least well after the burn-in period, and then slowly start to deteriorate.

This is one of the reasons that older computers need to be replaced — even if they’re still operating fast enough for their users. Eventually, they’ll break down and will need to be repaired or replaced.

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/how-to-create-a-technology-replacement-strategy/

forge

SharePoint Advisor Live! Day 1

I’m out at SharePoint Advisor Live!.  It’s good to get to talk to the other speakers to learn about how they’re using SharePoint in their worlds and talking to the attendees to learn about their challenges.  A few of the highlights from the day…

  • Echo for SharePoint (www.winapptechnologies.com) – A winform based application to migrate lists and web part pages from one site to another.  Currently only works on the local server (meaning they’re using the SP API).  No command line yet — so it won’t fit into automated deployments.  It does, however, manage to get past some of the issues that the two migration utilities that I’m working on are still having.
  • ParallelSpace (www.parallelspace.com) – Content migration utilities and security assessment utilities for SharePoint.
  • Microsoft/Domino connection (www.msdomino.net) – Allows for Domino/Notes to be shown in SharePoint.  Not clear on how it all works yet, the demo wasn’t fully functional yesterday when I went by but it’s definitely interesting.

There were some interesting conversations about off-line clients and rich clients for SharePoint.  Mostly the idea that Access might be a front end to SharePoint.  Specifically the thought of adding relationships to SharePoint list data was discussed.